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Title: Memory Beach Part #2 Artist: Ashley Anderson Medium: Giclee Print Size: 8” x 8”
Part of the “War Games” art show inspired by video games.
Memory Beach is a story told in three pictures. Each of the pieces are a mash up of images from Ao no Senritsu for the Famicom, Goonies, Sim City, Family Composer for the Famicom, Kame no Ongaeshi - Urashima Densetsu, Grand Prix II - 3D, Street Fighter 2 and Kazekiri.
Ashley Anderson’s use of pixel and raster imagery centers on the economy of representation springing from an economy of technology and its relationship with painting. The economy of technology in early computer imaging, long gone in terms of its active use, is an ancestor to and analogy of our current image-driven digital age, where truth is hard to spot and often seems lost. Idealism and perversion transform the original into something filtered and mutated, purer in its form but less clear. Similarly when the visual understanding breaks down to an hyperconcentrated facsimile, things strangely become less intelligible. All that remains are form and color, but a reference to the original remains.

Title: Memory Beach Part #2 
Artist: Ashley Anderson 
Medium: Giclee Print 
Size: 8” x 8”

Part of the “War Games” art show inspired by video games.

Memory Beach is a story told in three pictures. Each of the pieces are a mash up of images from Ao no Senritsu for the Famicom, Goonies, Sim City, Family Composer for the Famicom, Kame no Ongaeshi - Urashima Densetsu, Grand Prix II - 3D, Street Fighter 2 and Kazekiri.

Ashley Anderson’s use of pixel and raster imagery centers on the economy of representation springing from an economy of technology and its relationship with painting. The economy of technology in early computer imaging, long gone in terms of its active use, is an ancestor to and analogy of our current image-driven digital age, where truth is hard to spot and often seems lost. Idealism and perversion transform the original into something filtered and mutated, purer in its form but less clear. Similarly when the visual understanding breaks down to an hyperconcentrated facsimile, things strangely become less intelligible. All that remains are form and color, but a reference to the original remains.

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